Anti-Socialism Movies

Hollywood is known as a hotbed of Socialist and Globalist sentiments. But this wasn’t always the case. When Russia was known as the Soviet Union and posed an actual rather than an imaginary threat to democracy, talented artists tried to show what the world would be like under a Globalist regime. True artists know that Globalism is a threat to creativity, freedom and individuality.

The following 12 films expressed fears of Globalism as dystopian sci-fi fantasies. Even in the old days one couldn’t be too obvious in one’s anti-globalist sentiments – the socialist infiltration of the universities and bureaucracies had begun as early as the end of WW1. The movies had to be imaginative, even cartoonish, or people might get upset.

If you haven’t seen these movies here is a spoiler – very often the Globalists win and the hero is crushed or marginalized. That’s the real scary thing about the movies – not the monsters, robots, and nightmare imagery – the scary part is that the individual, the free thinker, the champion is most often defeated and the Globalist world prevails.

Another thing about these movies – many were made by Liberals – smart liberals who understood that Socialism, though a nice fantasy, doesn’t work in the real world.

Here are the movies in no particular order. I’ve linked them to Wikipedia.

 

Metropolis 1927

(the downtrodden poor toil in misery while the elite party)

Soylent Green 1973

(when everyone is totally dependent on the State, how does the State provide for them?)

Idiocracy 2006

(Socialists implement dumb ideas like replacing all water with “Brawndo” (Gatorade) since it has electrolytes)

They Live 1988

(the aliens are actually the Globalist elite hiding in plain sight among us)

1984 1984

(this is about the evils of Socialism – Big Brother is pretty much a stronger Bernie Sanders)

Fahrenheit 451 1966

(the State provides all knowledge and entertainment – so why would you need books?)

Harrison Bergeron 1995

(to make everyone equal, it’s easier to beat down the strong than to elevate the weak)

Rollerball 1975

(the only important people are those approved of by the State – everyone else is expendable)

The Time Machine 1960

(the Globalist monsters hidden underground raise beautiful people as food)

Videodrome 1983

(people who watch a lot of mediocre State sanctioned TV are easier to control)

The Trial 1962

(to Globalists, everyone is guilty until they prove their innocence – even if they don’t know the crime)

Brazil 1985

(Socialist bureaucracy run rampant)

Posted in Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your e-mail address to subscribe

Join 15,146 other subscribers

Recent Posts

close